BE Seminars & Events

Current Seminar Series: 2015-2016

Bioengineering Seminars are held on Thursdays at 10:30AM in 337 Towne Building unless otherwise noted below. For all Penn Engineering events, visit the Penn Calendar.

 

Weitz September 10
David A. Weitz
Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics, Harvard University
"Drop-based microfluidics:  Biology a picoliter at a time"
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This talk will describe the use of microfluidic technology to control and manipulate drops whose volume is about one picoliter.  These can serve as reaction vessels for biological assays.  These drops can be manipulated with very high precision using an inert carrier oil to control the fluidics, ensuring the samples never contact the walls of the fluidic channels.  Small quantities of other reagents can be injected with a high degree of control.  The drops can also encapsulate cells, enabling cell-based assays to be carried out.  Examples of the application of these devices to the study of fundamental biology will be described.  In addition, I will describe the impact this class of microfluidics is having on biotechnology.

  September 17
Jan Liphardt
Associate Professor of Bioengineering, Stanford University
Title TBA
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TBA

  October 1
Kwabena Boahen
Professor of Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering, Stanford University
Title TBA
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TBA
Sapiro

October 15
Guillermo Sapiro
Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. School Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University
"Image processing and machine learning helping to get advanced medicine to the masses: From brain surgery to mental health"

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Many of us are privileged and knowledgable to access advanced medicine when we unfortunately need it. A number of factors limit this access to the general population. I will demonstrate with two examples how we can brake that boundary.

First, we will show how to help deep brain stimulation (DBS), in particular for motor disorders, with advanced algorithms that permit to detect with high precision the surgical target. This opens the door to orders of magnitude expansion of DBS. From there we move to the use of technology, image processing, and machine learning to design screening tools for child mental health. We will illustrate this with Autism screening. Both examples illustrate results already in use in the OR and clinic, and exemplify both the need for the tools we develop and the value of having an incredible interdisciplinary team, all of which will be mentioned and introduced during the talk.
Ji October 22
Na Ji
Group Leader, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Research Campus
"From star to neuron - adaptive optical microscopy for deep brain imaging"
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TBA
 

November 5
Lauren Black
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University
Title TBA

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Imaging neurons deeply buried inside a live mouse using a microscope shares many similarities with gazing at distant stars with a telescope. In both cases, imaging capacity is limited by optical aberration and scattering. Wavefront shaping using adaptive optics has revolutionized astronomy by allowing us to obtain sharp images of celestial objects through the turbulent atmosphere. Simliar concepts may be applied to miscroscopy for optically transparent samples but not the scattering mammalian brains. In this talk, I will describe recent developments in adaptive optical microscopy, which allowed us to image both the input and output of mouse cerebral cortex with diffraction-limited resolution. By making it possible to functionally image axons and neurons deep inside the mouse brain, these techniques enabled novel discoveries on the origin of orientation selectivity in mouse primary visual cortex.
  December 3
Michael Hagan
Associate Professor of Physics, Brandeis University
Title TBA
Read the Abstract
TBA
 

December 10
Konrad Kording
Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, and Applied Mathematics, Northwestern University
Title TBA

Read the Abstract
TBA
 

January 14
Sanjay Kumar
Professor and Associate Chair of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley
Title TBA

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TBA

  January 21
Mehmet Toner
Professor of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School
Title TBA
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TBA
 

January 28
Dominique Durand
Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University
Title TBA

Read the Abstract
TBA
 
  February 4
Adam Abate
Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco
Title TBA
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TBA
  February 11
KC Huang
Associate Professor of Bioengineering and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford School of Medicine
Title TBA
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TBA
  February 18
Kyle Quinn
Postdoctoral Associate in Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University
Title TBA
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TBA
  February 25 - Grace Hopper Distinguished Lecture
Clare Waterman
NIH Distinguished Investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Tissue Morphodynamics, National Institutes of Health
Title TBA
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TBA

  March 3
Hui Mao
Professor of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine
Title TBA
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TBA

  March 10
Dan Simionescu
Associate Professor of Bioengineering, Clemson University
Title TBA
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TBA
  March 17
Prashant Mali
Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego
Title TBA
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TBA
  March 24 - Herman Schwan Distinguished Lecture
Lonnie Shea
Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Northwestern University
Title TBA
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TBA
  March 31
Gerard Ateshian
Andrew Walz Professor and Chair of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University
Title TBA
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New resting-state MRI acquisition and analysis techniques are making it possible to obtain information about network dynamics in the brain.  The patterns of changing network connectivity have been linked to fluctuations in simultaneous electrical recordings in healthy humans and anesthetized animals.  Based on these initial studies, we hypothesize that at least two independent processes contribute to the resting-state MRI signal.  The first is a quasiperiodic, large-scale spatiotemporal pattern that appears to arise from very low frequency (< 1 Hz) electrical activity and has plausible links to attention and vigilance.  The second process consists of irregular changes in the connectivity between selected areas.  It is linked to variation in the correlation of high frequency power, particularly in the beta and gamma bands, and we speculate that these changes may be more closely linked to cognitive processes.  If our hypothesis proves true, we may be able to separate out the relative contributions of these two sources to the MRI signal, with the goal of obtaining more sensitive indices of cognitive changes along with quantifiable monitoring of attention and vigilance.
 

April 7
Wan-Ju Li
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title TBA

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Content TBD
 

April 14
Hang Lu
Professor and James R. Fair Faculty Fellow, Georgia Tech
Title TBA

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TBA

  April 21
L. Mahadevan
Lola England de Valpine Professor of Applied Mathematics, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and Physics, Harvard University
Title TBA
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Content TBD